Interesting …


This is an interesting development from the Daily Mail online:

Shopping Trips

Just over a week ago, I needed to go to our local Aldi. The car park was full as usual, but there is a Screw-Fix next door with  very limited parking and people going there tend to use Aldi for their parking. Now what amazed me was the number of families that were shopping together. Now I can quite understand a single person taking his/her kids shopping with them, if there is nobody at home to look after them. But there can be no excuse for one of the families that was out that day.

ShoppingThe ‘group’ consisted of a man and a woman, I would say in their mid-forties, a youth, possibly aged 14 or 15, two young girls were were probably no more than 7 years and another boy who would have been about 11 years old. These are only guesses at the ages. Now, the two girls were sitting in one trolley pushed by whom I think would be the male parent. The female ‘parent’ was pushing another trolley and loading food and supplies into that. The youth was just moping around, with his ‘ear-buds’ in as if he didn’t want to be there and the 7 year old was racing up and down the aisles on his scooter.

I may be wrong, but I could not see any justification for them all being there together.

 

Interesting times …


I’ve had to do a couple of shopping trips in the past week. Just the essentials, wine, whiskey beer etc etc. I have been amazed at how my local Aldi has got their head around the ‘panic buying’ that we have seen reported. Shoppers queuing outside keeping two trolleys apart. They were operating a “10 out, 10 in” policy and it was working fine. People just seemed to be getting on with it. One funny moment though … an oldish guy turned up on his mobility scooter and started asking “Can I queue jump?” He asked a couple of times before the elderly lady behind me called out “No you can’t … join the queue like the rest.” She then explained that she knew him and it wasn’t his scooter. and that he wasn’t as disabled as he purported to be.

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Morrisons and Aldi today, and although they had got a queuing system in place, it was quiet and not really needed. Aldi still was operating the same system as before, but again it was very quiet. Only thing that I couldn’t get was plain flour and the obligatory loo rolls. I understand, that it is due to the fact that they can be used as paper handkerchiefs.

The thing that struck me most, was how nice people were being. No pushing or shoving. Everyone giving way to everyone. Most people keeping the 2 metre distance. However, the only people that seemed to not have a clue, seemed to be ‘old’ people. Old as in over 70 or so they seemed. One couple in Morrisons today did not seem to be aware of the 2 metre rule and gave me the oddest of looks when I asked them if they could move back a little.

Funniest thing of the day was when I was looking for plain flour. Morrisons had a few bags of own brand and a couple in front of me were looking at the shelf. Her husband said “There’s some!” His wife’s reply was “We don’t buy that type!” To which I relied “I do!” and plonked the offending object in my trolley.

The other funny thing I heard to day was a new word that has slipped into the British language. We had ‘Brexit’ now we have “Covidiots” Hate this ‘made-up-word’ stuff. I think it cheapens the British language somewhat.

Sorry … excuse me … sorry …


It’s amazing how people of my generation find themselves apologising for other peoples mistakes. Take today for example. I am pushing my trolley around a certain German discount supermarket (no not Lidl. and I know a joke about that*) dropping my carefully selected items in said trolley. I have just arrived at the fresh chicken section trolleywhen I’m faced with a gentleman(?) who had left his trolley in the middle of the aisle, whilst he tried to read the small print on the packet of chicken drumsticks. Just in front of him is a lady(again ?) whose trolley is neatly placed diagonally across the same aisle. As I sought to pass both of them, I was forced to move each trolley. I received a glare from one and a “tut tut” from the other as they realised that their trolley was being person-handled. I of course countered their responses with … Sorry! … Excuse me! … I’m sorry! I then carry on shopping, cursing myself for saying sorry all the time, when I should have been saying something in the order of “Move your bl***y trolleys you inconsiderate b***ards!”

I come across this a lot, especially in supermarkets. It’s as if some people are so far removed from reality that they think they are the only ones in the store. It’s not one single age group that’s at fault. They all seem to have the same problem. It must be a form of spacial awareness.

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In one of the small towns that are a part of Leeds area is a large Tesco. For some reason, Leeds planning department felt that it Tesco-Lidlwould be a great idea to allow a Lidl to be located next door. Literally, both stores share the same the entrance road. So here is the so called ‘joke’ I mentioned. *There had been an advertisement campaign for the new Lidl and a commenter on one of the social networks had heard about the financial losses at Tesco’s. His comment was : “Have you heard about the financial crisis at Tesco? Every Lidl helps!

Now I realise you have to be aware of the UK advertising slogans, but I thought it was quite funny.