Caught … after all I have said!


The number of times I have warned people about the dangers of Internet shopping, I go and get caught myself. I’m forever saying that ‘…if it looks to good to be true, then it is…’ I can’t remember how many times  I have told family and friends that the cheapest is not the best option as ‘…it’s usually cheap for a reason…’ That and advising people to look at the reviews and feedback, and then I go and ignore it all.

It was basically down to greed at the end of the day. I need a new, cordless hammer drill. The one I have is a cheapish one and I bought it about three years ago. The battery pack has started to lose it’s charge very quickly even if not in use. I can put it on charge one day and the charge will be lost without even using the thing. So when I had to use my corded drill to complete a simple job, I thought it was time to get an updated one. I did the usual trawl of the internet (or should I say eBay) to get the best price for what I wanted, and my results were coming up at between £35.00 and £50.00. So you can imagine my surprise when one showed up at £41.99 with ‘free’ accessory pack. What I wanted at the price I was willing to pay! Without any further research, I went through my cash-back site and purchased it, via PayPal.

It was a few hours later that I got an email from eBay advising me that “Your recent eBay transaction may be from a compromised account”. It also went on to explain, that “The item has been removed from the site, and the transaction was cancelled“. I checked my bank account, and of course the payment had gone through to PayPal. I then checked PayPal and found that the payment to the seller was pending. I quickly cancelled the payment and PayPal showed that my back account will be re-credited with the amount. There was a small caveat though, PayPal said it could take up to 30 days for the transaction to credit.

After wiping the egg off my face, I realised that this kind of thing can happen to anyone. I just took my eye off the ball and was caught. Massive lesson learned here.

Watch out !! Scammer about !!


I’m always up for a bargain, so when I decided that I needed to buy some ink for my printer, I turned as usual to the internet.  To be exact, I nearly always go though EBay and this occasion was no different. I ran a search and the price for a twin-pack (colour and black) seemed to be between £17.00 an £20.00, with the average price falling in at £18.49. A little more than I expected, so I sorted the list by price. Amazingly the price of £7.99 was listed for the same twin-pack size. A ‘bargain’ I thought and delved a little deeper into the product and seller. That is when I began to smell a rat!

A quick look at the seven reviews of the ink, showed that they were reviews for ink sold by a different seller. The reviews also had been made within 10 minutes of each other. Unusual to say the least. I then had a quick look at the sellers profile, which stated that they had been a member of EBay since August 7th 2017. The same day that I was looking. That rat smell was getting stronger. How could a seller have seven reviews (all showing 100%) for sales on the same day that they had started trading?

Unusually for me, I reported it to EBay, and was pleased to see that the following day, the listing had been removed. But what’s this? Further down the search was a new listing, from another new seller, selling the same pack at the same price, with even the same reviews! Another reporting to EBay. I look the next day (today) and once again the fraudulent listing has been removed, only to be replaced by two new listings for the same product, this time at £10.49. I will leave you to guess what I did next.

Now I would say that I’m quite a savvy shopper, so I wasn’t really taken in by this confidence trick, but there are many people that would see this is a real bargain. What seems to happening here is one of four things:

  1. they are selling fakes – possible
  2. they are selling stolen goods – more likely or
  3. they are just stealing peoples money – which is my favourite
  4. they are genuine

If number 4 was correct, and I have been mistaken, then why does EBay remove the listings?

The old adage seems to apply here – “If it looks too good to be true, then it probably isn’t”

A long day


   It seems to have been a very long day. I was dropping asleep around 9pm. I think it was a combination of the hot bath, and the late night last night. It was an interesting evening. I don’t know about K***, but I felt a little bit out of it last night. It was as if, they tolerated us being there, but I felt that we were not really being included. I got a bit of that last week. I don’t think I’ll be going next Wednesday, and I’ll have to have an excuse ready. May play on the fact that it too near pay day. May work.

   Our service head was in the office today. She was looking into a case, that has been escalated to her level. She popped over to see me, to thank me for the comments I had posted on the service bulletin board. Told me she was glad to see people using it. She is the type to mention things like that, but it was a nice touch.

   I’ve been doing a bit of fraud prevention this week. Our service manages the residents parking in Leeds. Because of the cost and restrictions, anywhere close to a site such as a hospital or shopping site or station, parking becomes an issue for the residents. In these areas, the Council will introduce residents parking permits. In some cases, the residents will try to make money from this, and the closer to the city centre, the more lucrative this can get. I recently spotted on a website, someone offering their parking permit for rent. After a bit of easy investigation, we are now in a position to take some action. Exactly what that action will be, remains to be seen.